The Walking Data: Surviving and Slaying the Monster of ROT (Redundant, Obsolete & Trivial) Records!

When:
October 19, 2016 @ 10:30 pm – October 20, 2016 @ 12:00 am
2016-10-19T22:30:00+00:00
2016-10-20T00:00:00+00:00
Where:
Hillman Library, Amy Knapp Room
3960 Forbes Ave
Pittsburgh, PA 15260
USA
Cost:
Free to ARMA and SLA members
Contact:
RSVP to Deborah Karafinski

Our next meeting will be our annual joint meeting with our new friends from SLA on

The Walking Data: Surviving and Slaying the Monster of ROT (Redundant, Obsolete and Trivial) Records!

Halloween is coming. Do you know where your ROT data is? You’d better get it, before it gets you! Ahead of your session, ARMA Pittsburgh encourages attendees to visit our highlighted ARMA Chapter Session-of-the-Month on Zombie Data and Tim Rankin’s after-the-scare Linked In discussion.

During Dave Cohen’s presentation,

David R. Cohen, Esq.

you will learn about identifying and defensibly remediating ROT data, to improve your electronic records and information management programs and reduce costs. During the session, we will discuss the “hidden monster” of ROT data, why it puts your company at great risk, and how you can use tools such as retention policies, data maps, survey assessments, legal hold databases, automated categorization, and statistical sampling, to develop and implement an effective and legally defensible remediation plan.

The presentation will include discussion of The Sedona Conference® Commentary on Inactive Information SourcesInactive Information Guidance Principles:

  • Principle 1: Subject to any preservation obligations related to pending or reasonably anticipated litigation or government investigation, an organization should take reasonable steps to determine whether an inactive information store contains information that the organization should retain based on legal retention requirements or business needs.
  • Principle 2: Subject to any preservation obligations related to pending or reasonably anticipated litigation or government investigation, an organization should avoid excessive retention of inactive information by destroying it when it is no longer necessary to meet legal retention requirements or business needs.
  • Principle 3: An organization should take reasonable steps to determine whether an inactive information store contains information that is potentially relevant in a pending or reasonably anticipated litigation or government investigation.
  • Principle 4: An organization should take reasonable measures, through IT practices and user-facing policies and procedures, to reduce the ongoing accumulation of inactive information.
  • Principle 5: An organization should consider establishing policies and procedures for the orderly migration of data required to be retained or preserved to supported formats, systems and media to reduce the need to retain/preserve inactive information.
  • Principle 6: An organization should consider whether and how its policies/procedures regarding inactive information should apply to third parties in possession of the organization’s inactive information.
  • Principle 7: An organization should consider periodically reviewing and updating any policies and procedures regarding inactive information to account for changes in laws, new forms of inactive information, and new technical capabilities or changes in business organization or requirements.
  • Principle 8: An organization should take reasonable steps to index/identify/organize/map corporate records (as reasonable, based on business needs) so as to minimize over-retention and disorganization.

We hope to hear from you in Tim Rankin’s Linked In discussion of this month’s ARMA Chapter Session-of-the-Month “Dispose of Zombie Data!”

Cost: Free for ARMA/SLA members and guests.

Pizza sponsor: Onbase Hyland Software

Please RSVP Friday, October 14 at 12:00 p.m. to Deb S. Karafinski at Deb.Karafinski@CookMedical.com.

 

Written by

No Comments Yet.

Leave a Reply

Message